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From neuronal fate to wiring

Provisional programme

Thursday 20th September Speaker
8:45 9:00 Registration and Coffee 
9:00 9:15 Opening remarks Sarah Bray
9:15 9:45 Compartment-specific protein translation in presynaptic boutons and postsynaptic spines Erin Schuman Max Planck Institute for Brain Research, Frankfurt
9:45 10:15 Retinal stem cells: growing and regenerating a retina Muriel Perron Paris-Saclay Institute of Neurosciences, Orsay
10:15 10:30 Interplay between interkinetic nuclear migration and cell fate determination in the developing zebrafish retina Afnan Azizi PDN, University of Cambridge
10:30 11:00 Coffee
11:00 11:30 The struggle to make axons regenerate James Fawcett Centre for Brain Repair, Cambridge
11:30 12:00 Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Pseudostratified Epithelia* (*But Were Afraid to Ask) Caren Norden MPI of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden
12:00 12:30 Axons feel the force - The mechanics of neuronal development Kristian Franze PDN, University of Cambridge
12:30 13:45 Lunch
13:45 14:00 Short talk: Benita Benita Turner-Bridger PDN, University of Cambridge
14:00 14:30 Patterning the path from eye to brain for binocular vision Carol Mason Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute, Columbia University, New York
14:30 15:00 Interneuron diversity in the spinal cord, during metamorphosis and disease progression Chris Kintner Salk Institute, San Diego.
15:00 15:15 short talk
15:15 15:45 Tea
15:45 16:15 Drosophila retinal morphogenesis, there and back again Don Ready Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette
16:15 16:45 A new model of drug discovery for axon regeneration John Bixby University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami
16:45 17:15 The Retinome Josh Sanes Center for Brain Science, Harvard University
17:15 17:45 Closing remarks
19:00 Dinner St John's College
Friday 21st September
9:00 14:00 Meeting of Harris and Holt Labs Alumni

Registrations are now closed.

Venue

Department of Physiology Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge and St John's College Cambridge

With support from