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Dr Clare Buckley

My lab uses optogenetic and live confocal imaging within the zebrafish neural tube to test the role of cell polarity in building epithelial integrity during organ development and in breaking it during disease.
Dr Clare  Buckley

Sir Henry Dale Fellow

Clare Buckley is accepting applications for PhD students.


Office Phone: +44 (0) 1223 3 33766

Biography:

Clare received her undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences from the University of Oxford. Her PhD in Neuroscience was from the laboratory of Robin Franklin at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with a small biotechnology company, Summit Plc. (previously DanioLabs). Clare carried out her postdoctoral work in the laboratory of Jon Clarke at King’s College London, during which time she held a short-term EMBO fellowship at Orion Weiner’s laboratory at the University of California, San Francisco to develop the Phytochrome system for use in zebrafish. She started her lab at the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge with a Royal Society Dorothy Hodgkin Research Fellowship and is now a Sir Henry Dale Fellow.

Research Interests

Currently recruiting postdocs: http://www.jobs.cam.ac.uk/job/16315/

My lab uses optogenetic and live confocal imaging within the zebrafish neural tube to test the role of cell polarity in building epithelial integrity during organ development and in breaking it during disease.

In combination with high resolution in vivo imaging, we use a new optogenetic approach to directly manipulate the polarity, signalling and division of single cells within the developing zebrafish brain. Along with CRISPR-mediated functional knock down experiments, this allows us to explore how cell polarity and division are linked during development such that cells can divide without disrupting the strict organization of the tissue. We are also testing the role of polarity dysregulation in tissue disruption by optogenetically manipulating polarity-linked signalling pathways (such as the PI3K pathway) in the already established zebrafish neural tube epithelium.

We hope to unravel parallel mechanisms of epithelial development and disease in vivo.

Collaborators

Jared Toettcher, Princeton University

 

Collaborators

Key Publications

Buckley CE. (2018) Optogenetic control of subcellular protein location and signalling in vertebrate embryos in Vertebrate embryogenesis: embryological, cellular and genetic methods, 2nd Edition (F. Pelegri, Ed.), Methods in Molecular Biology, in press.

Buckley CE, Moore RE, Reade A, Goldberg AR, Weiner OD and Clarke JDW. Reversible Optogenetic Control of Subcellular Protein Localization in a Live Vertebrate Embryo. Dev Cell (2016) Jan 11:36(1): 117-26

Buckley CE and Clarke JDW. Establishing the plane of symmetry for lumen formation and bilateral brain formation in the zebrafish neural rod. Semin Cell Dev Biol. (2014) Jul;31: 100-5

Buckley CE, Ren X, Ward LC, Girdler GC, Araya C, Green MJ, Clark BS, Link BA and Clarke JDW. Mirror-symmetric microtubule assembly and cell interactions drive lumen formation in the zebrafish neural rod. EMBO J. (2013) Jan 9;32(1): 30-44

Buckley CE, Marguerie A, Roach AG, Goldsmith P, Fleming A, Alderton WK and Franklin RJM. Drug reprofiling using zebrafish identifies novel compounds with potential pro-myelination effects. Neuropharmacology (2010) Sep;59(3):149-59

Buckley CE, Marguerie A, Alderton WK and Franklin RJM. Temporal Dynamics of Myelination in the Zebrafish Spinal Cord. GLIA (2010) 58:802–812.

Buckley CE, Goldsmith P and Franklin RJM. Zebrafish Myelination: A Transparent Model for Remyelination? DMM (2008) 1: 221-228

 

Above: Mosaically labelled neuroepithelial cells in the developing zebrafish neural tube