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Dr Antonios Georgantzoglou

My project focuses on the investigation of how chemoattractant gradients are interpreted by migrating leukocytes in vivo.
Dr Antonios Georgantzoglou

Research Associate


Office Phone: +44 (0) 1223 768083

Research Interests

My general interest lies in the quantitative investigation of cell dynamics and the development of image processing tools for this purpose.

My current research project focuses on leukocyte migration, stimulated by chemoattractants. Recent in vivo studies have shown that these cells alter their speed as they move closer to a source of chemoattractant. Through in vivo imaging in zebrafish and by developing image analysis algorithms, I am studying the driving force behind this leukocyte mobilisation, which is driven by actin dynamics (Video, right). To induce directed leukocyte migration I use assays developed in the Sarris lab such as laser wounding, local bacterial injections or photo-activatable chemokine release.

During my PhD, I developed a software for cell tracking and division for investigation of cell responses to external particle radiation. Analysis of cell fate post-irradiation generates valuable and reliable data for successful charged particle radiation therapy.

Collaborators

Dr Milka Sarris
Mr Hugo Poplimont
Ms Caroline Coombs
Ms Kim Westerich
Mr Edward Mawdsley

 

Key Publications

Georgantzoglou A, Merchant MJ, Jeynes JCG, Mayhead N, Punia N, Butler RE, Jena R, (2016), Applications of high-throughput clonogenic survival assays in high-LET particle microbeams, Front Oncol, 5:305. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2015.00305

Georgantzoglou A, Merchant MJ, Jeynes JCG, Wéra A-C, Kirkby KJ, Kirkby NF, Jena R, (2015), Automatic cell detection in bright-field microscopy for microbeam irradiation studies, Phys Med Biol, 60(16):6289-303

Georgantzoglou A, da Silva J, Jena R, (2014), Image Processing with MATLAB and GPU, In: MATLAB Applications for the Practical Engineer, Ed. K. Bennett. Rjeka: InTech

 

 

Above: Actin polymerisation is visualised and monitored using a spinning disk confocal microscope.