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Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Studying at Cambridge

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How does the brain’s spatial map change when we change the shape of the room?
Study published in Science by Juljia Kupric examines the role of “metric” cells in the GPS of the brain
Located in News
PDN scientists discover the secrets behind the cuttlefish’s 3D ‘invisibility cloak’
An international team of scientists led by Trevor Wardill has identified the neural circuits that enable cuttlefish to change their appearance in just the blink to eye – and discovered that this is similar to the neural circuit that controls iridescence in squids.
Located in News
Research on the brain’s reward system wins the world’s largest prize for neuroscience
PDN's Wolfram Schultz jointly awarded The 2017 Brain Prize for his analysis of reward recognition and processing.
Located in News
Detect. Lock on. Intercept. The remarkable hunting ability of the robber fly
A small fly posseses the remarkable ability to detect and intercept its prey mid-air, changing direction mid-flight if necessary before sweeping round for the kill, new research on Current Biology reveals
Located in News
Genome editing reveals role of gene important for human embryo development
CTR researchers have revealed the role of the OCT4 gene in human embryos in the first few days of development. This is the first time that genome editing has been used to study gene function in human embryos.
Located in News
Skin found to play a role in controlling blood pressure
New study by Randall Johnson on eLife shows that skin reacts to the changes in oxygen in the air to regulate blood pressure and hearth rate
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Sheep are able to recognise human faces from photographs
Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits – and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training – according to new research from Jenny Morton's lab
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Human reproduction likely to be more efficient than previously thought
How difficult is it to conceive? According to a widely-held view, fewer than one in three embryos make it to term, but a new study from Gavin Jarvis suggests that human embryos are not as susceptible to dying in the first weeks after fertilisation as often claimed.
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Low thyroid hormone before birth alters growth and development of fetal pancreas
Levels of thyroid hormone in babies influence insulin-secreting cells of the pancreas, according to a new study published in The Journal of Physiology.
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Early-stage embryos with abnormalities may still develop into healthy babies
Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign that a baby will be born with a birth defect such as Down’s syndrome, suggests new research by Zernicka-Goetz's lab. In a study published in Nature Communications, scientists show that abnormal cells are eliminated and replaced by healthy cells, repairing – and in some cases completely fixing – the embryo.
Located in News