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Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Studying at Cambridge

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RNA docking and local translation control axon remodelling in vivo
New research by Christine Holt's lab published in Neuron shows that local mRNA translation is a key determinant in the branching of axons and thus important in building the complexity of the brain
Located in News
Mechanism behind neuron death in motor neurone disease and frontotemporal dementia discovered
Scientists from Christine Holt lab in collaboration with the University of Toronto have identified the molecular mechanism that leads to the death of neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as ALS or motor neurone disease) and a common form of frontotemporal dementia.
Located in News
Cell Reports: local role of miRNAs in mRNA-specific translation during axon pathfinding
Small RNA-seq analysis reveals that miR-182 is the most abundant miRNA in RGC axons
Located in News
Christine Holt awarded €1 million prize for research on connection between eye and brain
Prof Christine Holt from the PDN has received the 2016 Antonio Champalimaud Vision Award, the largest in the world in the field of vision
Located in News
Local translation of mRNAs in axons is developmentally regulated
Christine Holt's lab research featured on Cell examines axon translation during development of retinal ganglion cells through RNA sequencing
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Prof Christine Holt awarded Ferrier Medal 2017
The Royal Society award recognizes Holt's work in understanding molecular mechanisms involved in nerve growth, guidance and targeting
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The amazing axon adventure - Christine Holt on Research Horizons
How does the brain make connections, and how does it maintain them? Cambridge neuroscientists and mathematicians are using a variety of techniques to understand how the brain ‘wires up’, and what it might be able to tell us about degeneration in later life.
Located in News