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Integration with clinical medicine

Anatomy in clinical medicine

Jump to: Anatomy Revision Sessions

Student Selected Components

Medical Electives

Other Projects

 

Anatomy is the foundation for all branches of clinical medicine. The anatomy courses in the first two years of preclinical medicine, Functional Architecture of the Body (MVSTIA) and Head and Neck Anatomy (MVSTIB), as well as the anatomy projects undertaken in Part II PDN, equip our students with the knowledge and understanding of the human body that is needed for their clinical course at the School of Clinical Medicine.

From October 2014, all students entering the preclinical course will remain at Cambridge for their clinical studies, providing an opportunity for increased integration of preclinical and clinical curricula. In anatomy teaching, this already occurs on a number of different levels in the preclinical courses:

  • Applied Anatomy sessions in the preclinical courses comprise case scenarios, radiology stations, surface anatomy and live demonstrations
  • Clinical Demonstration sessions at Addenbrooke's Hospital with consultants presenting patients with relevant signs and symptoms
  • Abdominal ultrasound sessions where students can revise their anatomy through observing real-time scanning of volunteers
  • Fibreoptic nasopharyngolaryngoscopy on student volunteers for demonstration of structures in the upper respiratory tract

The following collaborations between organisers of preclinical anatomy teaching and clinicians of different specialties at Addenbrooke's Hospital will enhance further integration of anatomical knowledge into clinical practice:

  • Development of 3D imaging for teaching in Head & Neck Anatomy and Neuroanatomy with Consultant Neurosurgeons Mr Ramez Kirollos, Mr Thomas Santarius, Mr Rikin Trivedi and members of their team
  • Integration of preclinical and clinical case-based learning for Musculoskeletal Anatomy with Professor Andrew McCaskie, Mr Niel Kang, Mr Stephen McDonnell and members of the orthopaedics team
  • Investigation of student attitudes to cadaveric dissection, the development of professionalism and exploration of issues surrounding mortality with Dr Stephen Barclay and a number of clinical students

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Anatomy Revision Sessions

In previous years, clinical students in Year 4 returned to the Dissection Room for two 2-hour Anatomy Revision Sessions which took place during their Review & Integration weeks in November and February.

In the revised Clinical Curriculum, students will have Anatomy Revision Sessions in each of Years 4, 5 and 6, to cover different regions of the body. The focus of these sessions is on the application of anatomical knowledge to clinical practice, comprising OSCE-type stations, with case scenarios and corresponding prosections. 

2015-16

TBC 2017             Head and neck (Year 6)                     

18 Aug 2016        Abdomen and pelvis (Year 5)

11 Dec 2015        Thorax and peripheral joints (Year 4)

2014-15

9-10 Feb 2015     Head and neck, abdomen and pelvis (Year 4)

10-11 Nov 2014   Limbs, spine and thorax (Year 4)

2013-14

6-7 Feb 2014       Head and neck, abdomen and pelvis (Year 4)

11-12 Nov 2013   Limbs, spine and thorax (Year 4)

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Student Selected Components

Clinical students may elect to take Student Selected Components with the Human Anatomy Teaching Group.  More details may be found on the SSC webpage of the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine.

2015-16

Jonathan Bartlett (CC), supervised by Mr John Lawrence

  • What Risk is Posed to the Lateral Femoral Cutaneous Nerve in Modern Hip Surgery? (abstract)

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Medical Electives

The Elective provides an opportunity for clinical students to organise a scientific project of their own choice.  More details may be found in the Elective webpage of the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine.  

2015-16

Ashley Ferro (HH), assisted by Shadi El-Basyuni (HH), supervised by Mr Vijay Santhanum

Much of this work is being undertaken at the Duckworth Laboratory at the Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies, supported by Dr Marta Mirazon Lahr

  • Determination of a reliable reference point to prevent zygomaticofacial neurovascular damage in zygomatic and orbital floor surgery 

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Other Projects

2015-16

In collaboration with Dr Stephen Barclay, Consultant in Palliative Care, Fellow & Director of Studies, Emmanuel College

Victoria Morley (JN) and John Foreman (DOW)

  • Anxiety and Anticipation: How do medical students feel prior to entry into the Dissecting Room? (abstract)

Oral presentation at the BACA (British Association of Clinical Anatomists) Winter Meeting, 10 December 2015 at St George’s, University of London

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