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The School of Biological Sciences Survey

Link to the survey

https://www.orcsmartsurveys.com/uocbiological2016

What?

The School of Biological Sciences is running a School survey during Easter term 2016. This is the second time the School has asked you for your views on working at the University and it is your chance to tell us what you think about a range of work-related issues.

When?

The survey will run for three weeks during Easter Term: 11 – 29 April 2016.

Why?

This is an opportunity for you to have your say and give your views on important aspects of your employment with the University.

Your responses will identify areas for improvement for individual departments and institutes, and help inform strategic decisions that will have an ongoing positive impact on everyone in the School.

How?

ORC International, an independent research organisation, has been commissioned to run the survey on behalf of the School. The survey will be conducted online via a secure website hosted by ORC, which will ensure your responses will not be seen by anyone at the University. The results will be provided by anonymised reports. At no point will it be possible for individual responses to be identified. Paper copies and pre-paid reply envelopes will be made available for those who do not have regular access to a computer.

The results from the survey will be available to be shared with staff from June 2016 onwards.

Questions?

You can download the Frequently Asked Questions document that provides more information. However, if you need to know anything else, please get in touch with your key contacts.

Survey key contacts

First key contact: Elaine Murdie, edm25@cam.ac.uk, 33769

Second key contact: Angela Lowe, aml72@cam.ac.uk, 33772

 

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