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Steve Edgley

Motor Systems Neurophysiology: my research seeks to understand how information is processed in Motor Systems.
Steve Edgley

Reader in Neuroscience

Director of Studies in Preclinical Medicine, St John's College

Tutor, St John's College

Steve Edgley is accepting applications for PhD students.

Office Phone: 01223 333757

Research areas


Research Interests

We are interested in how movements are controlled by neural circuits. Our everyday movements are performed with little conscious thought and are remarkably precise. Despite what the textbooks tell you, the neural mechanisms by which this is accomplished are poorly understood. We work at several levels, particularly at the spinal cord and cerebellum.

My work involves electrophysiology, recording and analysing the signals neurons use to talk to each other. Most current work relates to the cerebellum, which has a well defined circuitry, and how it contributes to a learning process that  ‘automates’ movements.

Lab members

Dr Tahl Holtzman (Research Associate)
Mr H J Room MA (Graduate Student)
Abteen Mostofi (Graduate Student)
Wei Xu (Graduate Student)

Main collaborators

Elzbieta Jankowska (Gotheburg, Sweden)
Chris Yeo (UCL, London)


MVST Part Ia Functional Architecture of the Body - Lecturer

MVST Part Ib Head and Neck Anatomy - Lecturer

MVST Part Ib Neurobiology and Human Behaviour -  Course organiser and Lecturer

MVST Part Ib Neurobiology and Animal Behaviour -  Course organiser and Lecturer

MVST Part Ib Practical and Clinical Neuroanatomy -  Course organiser

NST PDN/Neuroscience  Part II Module 7: Control of Action - -  Course organiser and Lecturer

Chair of the Teaching Committee, Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Key Publications

Soteropoulos DS, Edgley SA, Baker SN. (2013) Spinal commissural connections to motoneurons controlling the primate hand and wrist. J Neurosci. 2013 33(23):9614-25. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0269-13.2013.PMID:23739958

Xu W, Jones S, Edgley SA, (2013), Event time representation in cerebellar mossy fibres arising from the lateral reticular nucleus, J Physiol, 591(Pt 4):1045-62

Zaaimi B, Edgley SA, Soteropoulos DS, Baker SN, (2012), Changes in descending motor pathway connectivity after corticospinal tract lesion in macaque monkey, Brain, 135(Pt 7):2277-89

Jankowska E, Edgley SA, (2010), Functional subdivision of feline spinal interneurons in reflex pathways from group Ib and II muscle afferents; an update, Eur J Neurosci, 32(6):881-93

Mostofi A, Holtzman T, Grout AS, Yeo CH, Edgley SA (2010), Electrophysiological localization of eyeblink-related microzones in rabbit cerebellar cortex, J Neurosci, 30(26):8920-34

Riddle CN, Edgley SA, Baker SN, (2009), Direct and indirect connections with upper limb motoneurons from the primate reticulospinal tract, J Neurosci, 29(15):4993-9

Holtzman T, Mostofi A, Phuah CL, Edgley SA, (2006), Cerebellar Golgi cells in the rat receive multimodal convergent peripheral inputs via the lateral funiculus of the spinal cord, J Physiol, 577(Pt 1):69-80

Jankowska E, Edgley SA, Krutki P, Hammar I, (2005), Functional differentiation and organization of feline midlumbar commissural interneurones, J Physiol, 565(Pt 2):645-58

Edgley SA, Jankowska E, Hammar I, (2004), Ipsilateral actions of feline corticospinal tract neurons on limb motoneurons, J Neurosci, 24(36):7804-13

Edgley SA, Eyre JA, Lemon RN, Miller S, (1997), Comparison of activation of corticospinal neurons and spinal motor neurons by magnetic and electrical transcranial stimulation in the lumbosacral cord of the anaesthetized monkey, Brain, 120 (Pt 5):839-53

Edgley SA, Eyre JA, Lemon RN, Miller S, (1990), Excitation of the corticospinal tract by electromagnetic and electrical stimulation of the scalp in the macaque monkey, J Physiol, 425:301-20

Edgley SA, Jankowska E, (1987), An interneuronal relay for group I and II muscle afferents in the midlumbar segments of the cat spinal cord, J Physiol, 389:647-74

Edgley SA, Lidierth M, (1987), The discharges of cerebellar Golgi cells during locomotion in the cat, J Physiol, 392:315-32

Armstrong DM, Edgley SA, (1984), Discharges of Purkinje cells in the paravermal part of the cerebellar anterior lobe during locomotion in the cat, J Physiol, 352:403-24

Above: Dark field light micrograph of a juxtacellularly-filled cerebellar Golgi cell. In the middle of the picture is the cell body from which several principal dendrites emanate. Surrounding this is an extensively branching axonal tree containing many thousands of presynaptic swellings or boutons, a feature characteristic of Golgi cells. From The Journal of Physiology 574 (cover illustration).

Above: Bilateral brain stimulation. The magnetic coils are fixed onto the motorbike helmet, one on each side. This is non-invasive and non-noxious!